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14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19 November 2006
Robert Schumann
Genoveva
This production has been generously sponsored by the Fondazione Banco di Sicilia

 
Conductor
Gabriele Ferro
Producer
Daniele Abbado
Scenes Designer
Graziano Gregori
Costumes Designer
Carla Teti
Chorus Master
Paolo Vero
Coreographer
Giovanni Di Cicco
Lighting Designer
Bruno Ciulli

Cast
Hidulfus
Ned Barth (14, 16, 17 e 19)
Thomas Gazheli (15 e 18)
Siegfried
Peter Weber (14, 16, 17 e 19)
Davide Damiani (15 e 18)
Genoveva
Martina Serafin (14, 16, 17 e 19)
Lisa Houben (15 e 18)
Golo
Herbert Lippert (14, 16, 17 e 19)
Andreas Wagner (15 e 18)
Margaretha
Katja Lytting (14, 16, 17 e 19)
Monica Minarelli (15 e 18)
Drago
Alessandro Guerzoni (14, 16 e 19)
Juri Batukov (15, 17 e 18)
Caspar
Giovanni Bellavia (14, 15, 16, 17, 18 e 19)
Angelo
Roberto Finocchio (14, 15, 16, 17, 18 e 19)
Conrad
Alessio Barone (14, 15, 16, 17, 18 e 19)
Teatro Massimo Orchestra and Chorus

A new production by the Teatro Massimo

Timetable
Tuesday 14 November, at 8.30 pm
season premiere
Wednesday 15 November, at 6.30 pm
s1
Thursday 16 November, at 6.30 pm
b
Friday 17 November, at 6.30 pm
c
Saturday 18 November, at 8.30 pm
f
Sunday 19 November, at 5.30 pm
d

Synopsis

Genoveva is based on the story of Genevieve of Brabant, a medieval legend set in the 8th century that is reputedly based on the 13th century life of Marie of Brabant, wife of Louis ii, Duke of Bavaria. The story gained in popularity during the first half of the 17th century, primarily in Germany through various theatrical settings. Two of the settings from this period, Ludwig Tieck’s play Leben und Tod der heiligen Genoveva (Life and Death of Saint Genoveva) and Friedrich Hebbel’s play Genoveva, served as the basis for the opera’s libretto. The plot of the opera has several similarities with Richard Wagner’s Lohengrin, which was composed during the same period as Schumann was writing Genoveva. The opera begins with Hidulfus, Bishop of Trier, summoning Brabant’s Christian knights to join Charles Martel’s crusade against a feared Saracen conquest of Europe. Siegfried, Count of Brabante, answers the call. In preparing to leave for war, he entrusts his wife, Genoveva, to his young servant, Golo. Despite Golo’s overwhelming desire for her, Genoveva persistently rejects his advances. Infuriated by these rejections, Golo seeks revenge against Genoveva by staging a trap to discredit her. One night, Golo sneaks Drago, an old steward, into Genoveva’s bedroom to fake an adulterous affair that is then witnessed by other servants, brought to the Set Designer by Golo. Word of this imagined infidelity gets back to Siegfried, who then commands Golo to put Genoveva to death. As two armed men are dispatched to kill Genoveva, her life is saved through the intervention of a mute, deaf boy. Siegfried then discovers Golo’s treachery and restores his wife’s honor.
Photographs

(Click on any photo to enlarge)

Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva
Foto di scena dell'opera Genoveva

Photographs Franco Lannino ©Studio Camera